The CPU architecture is just one example that has an impact on how easy or how hard it is to have a high-performance implementation of a language. In this aspect, C++ platform is much better than .Net. Although you still need a good computer, but capacity won't be too much of concern compare to .Net. Why do dig, host and nslookup return different results? Compiler writers have finite resources, so they can't implement every possible optimization, even ignoring the other issues. This requires a runtime check, but provides a much nicer semantics to the programmer. Why do more powerful programming languages tend to have slower implementations? The simplest interpreter has within it executable code corresponding to the various features the language supports—so it will have functions for adding numbers, joining strings, whatever else a given language has. First, it is much easier to get a program written in Python to run on Linux, Windows, and macOS. The longevity of Fortran happens to be a good example of this. Join the Ars Orbital Transmission mailing list to get weekly updates delivered to your inbox. I have noticed that some applications or algorithms that are built on a programming language, say C++/Rust run faster or snappier than those built on say, Java/Node.js, running on the same machine. For a long time, equivalent programs in Fortran and C (or C++) would be faster in Fortran, because Fortran enabled better optimizations. But! At one end, we have traditional compiled languages, a group that includes Fortran, C, and C++. © 2020 Condé Nast. In our look at scientific computing and the continued longevity of Fortran in science and engineering circles, one of the recurring themes in the discussion that followed was performance. The compiled program was checked for errors during compilation. To compile a simple C program in Linux, use the gcc compiler: The above command turns the code from human-readable format into machine code that the computer can run natively. It bears repeating that the algoritm used is most important. Advantages of compiled languages Programs that are compiled into native machine code tend to be faster than interpreted code. The benefits of using a compiler to compile code is that the final product generally runs faster than interpreted code because it doesn't need to compile on the fly while the application is running. Between the extremes are a range of options. Even if you just want to developer in let's say C#, the IDE itself will includes many programming platforms by default such as J#, VB, mobile and etc by default. Microsoft probably employs more people making coffee for their compiler programmers than the entire PHP, Ruby, and Python community combined has people working on their VMs. If the arrays overlap then there's no right way to process the data, so it's bad luck that the optimizations can't be used. Python is a popular interpreted language. It only takes a minute to sign up. A compiled program runs by executing the name of the compiled program from the shell: The benefits of using a compiler to compile code is that the final product generally runs faster than interpreted code because it doesn't need to compile on the fly while the application is running. Of course, this has nothing to do with "speed of writing code". When do we ever see the "commander" on xcom game? In a dynamically typed, interpreted language, every time one computes x - y, the interpreter often has to check whether both x,y are numbers and (e.g.) site design / logo © 2020 Stack Exchange Inc; user contributions licensed under cc by-sa. C++, very close to machine code and one of the favor programming in the older time (like more than 10+ years ago?) As it parses the code, it will look up the corresponding function and execute it. However, mainstream languages don't tend to switch too often; C++ is essentially always going to be compiled ahead of time.